free fire cider

 

Fire Cider is a traditional folk remedy used by people over the ages to improve digestion and build seasonal immunity. This tasty remedy is an oxymel, an herbal medicine made with apple cider vinegar, raw honey and herbs that promotes respiratory health and warms up the body.  Just a tablespoon a day keeps sore throats at bay and stokes the fires of digestion, which slows during winter.

The following recipe is an adaptation taken from Rosemary Gladstar's book Herbal Recipes For Vibrant Health, a book published in the 1990's. The term 'Fire Cider' is a generic term for this type of herbal remedy.  The purpose of this post is to freely share this recipe, empowering all to create their own version of this spicy tonic or to purchase their own bottle from herbalists who are committed to preserving herbalism as the medicine of the people.  Visit FreeFireCider.com for more information!

Fire Cider is an easy  remedy that anyone can make.  The recipe below can be used as a frame work.  Add what ever herb you wish and see how it can change the flavor!

Ingredients

glass quart jar with plastic lid

1/2 cup fresh chopped organic ginger root

1 medium organic onion, chopped

1/2 cup fresh grated organic horseradish root

10 cloves or whole head of organic garlic, crushed or chopped

2 organic hot peppers of your choice

several sprigs of fresh organic rosemary 

several sprigs of fresh thyme

1 TBS organic turmeric powder or one fresh root chopped

organic unpasteurized apple cider vinegar-- 32oz bottle of the Bragg's should do

raw local honey to taste

directions

Prepare all of your roots, fruits and herbs, and place them in a quart sized jar.  If you've never grated fresh horseradish, be prepared for a powerful sinus opening experience!  Feel free to use gloves during the chopping process of all of these spicy plants.  When you are finished adding all of your ingredients to your jar, pour the apple cider vinegar into the jar making sure you fill it all the way to the top.  Lid your jar with your plastic lid and make sure it's tight.  If you don't have a plastic lid, you may use a piece of natural parchment paper under the lid to keep the vinegar from touching the metal.

Store in a dark, cool place for at least one month and make sure to shake your jar daily!  I've allowed some fire cider batches to sit for four months.  Use your intuition to decide when yours is ready!

After at least one month has passed, use cheesecloth to strain out the pulp, pouring the vinegar into a clean jar.  Be sure to squeeze as much of the liquid goodness as you can from the pulp while straining.  Next comes the honey!  Add 1/4 cup of honey and stir until incorporated.  Taste your cider and add more honey until you reach the desired sweetness.  Green blessings and vibrant health!